The physiotherapy treatments and exercise regimes we offer at Cramond Residence help the residents improve and maintain their mobility, strength and flexibility. They also help prevent falls and decrease the pain of joint problems or similar ailments. Most residents tell us that they feel good after an exercise session and that feeling fitter helps them be more independent.

Can you tell me a little about yourself?

I am originally from Bergen, Norway. I moved to Scotland in 2011 to study physiotherapy at QMU and am currently living in Fife with my partner. I enjoy trail running, hiking and spending time outside with my dog. I also love socialising with friends and family, spending time in the kitchen trying out new recipes and drinking good coffee.

What’s your role at Balanced Edinburgh?

I am one of Balanced’s full-time physiotherapists and I work at the company’s clinics in Stockbridge and Burgess and at Cramond Residence. I have a special interest in treating more senior patients, offering functional fitness assessments and classes, both online and in person. I like to use various different approaches to treat people, including rehab exercises, soft tissue techniques, mobilisations and taping.

What training and experience did you have?

I previously worked as an assistant carer in Norway in a dementia care home and as a home carer. Overall, I’ve been working with elderly clients for over 11 years now. As well as my basic training, I have taken regular additional courses and have special expertise in areas such as functional fitness, group exercises and falls prevention (I am a ‘falls ambassador’).

What is an average day at Cramond Residence like?

We start the day by speaking to the nursing and care staff to get up to date with how the residents are doing. Then I decide who to prioritise and plan my day alongside my other physio colleagues Nicola Macintosh and Lesley Kempsell. The assessment of new residents is important and I tend to start there, working treatment times around the classes we have scheduled. I also work closely with the Residence’s lifestyle team to make sure that, between us, we are doing enough to keep the residents stimulated and active.

What are the sessions you run like?

Physio sessions vary depending on each resident’s specific needs. They can be as simple as encouraging somebody to take a walk around the garden or they can involve a set of bespoke exercises in the gym. Our weekly group sessions involve a range of sitting and standing exercises designed to boost mobility and flexibility. Sessions normally take place in the gym, using the weights, mats and bars that are available. However, if the sun is shining we’ll take advantage of the good weather and complete the exercises in the Residence’s garden.

What aspects of your work at Cramond do you most like?

I am really excited to be a part of the Cramond Residence team and have enjoyed every minute of working there so far. We laugh a lot and the staff and residents are great fun. I love interacting with the residents and listening to their life stories. It is also a privilege to be able to help improve their health and well-being and enhance their general quality of life. Hopefully I can continue to improve the services we offer at Cramond and to make a meaningful difference to the lives of many more residents.

Are there any aspect of the job that are challenging?

Sometimes residents are reluctant to come and do their exercises, especially after lunch! I have to encourage them to join in. Often they are more motivated to play a game or do an activity such as balloon badminton or bowls.

What benefits does your physiotherapy bring?

The physiotherapy treatments and exercise regimes we offer at Cramond Residence help the residents improve and maintain their mobility, strength and flexibility. They also help prevent falls and decrease the pain of joint problems or similar ailments. Most residents tell us that they feel good after an exercise session and that feeling fitter helps them be more independent. Working out together can also have a positive effect and this also helps to improve the residents’ quality of life

How did you get into physiotherapy?

I always enjoyed being active and found it interesting to learn about the human body in school. I started working in care and got drawn toward physiotherapy. I really enjoyed working with the elderly in Norway and I am happy that here in Scotland I can combine being a physiotherapist with helping people as they get older.

How does physiotherapy help you with your own well-being?

Physiotherapy feeds my passion for learning new techniques and exercises. I find it rewarding when I see patient achieve their goals. It really puts a smile on my face to see them progress and get better.